Britain's treatment towards 'non-traditional' religions.

Updated: Aug 27, 2021

With over 4,000 religions in the world, religion means something different to everyone. In a westernised society like the UK, secularism is on the rise with over 40% of individuals having no religious alliances. The main reason being that the older generations are being replaced by the younger demographic who are less in touch with their religion.


However, this transition into a secular society has not prevented some of the older generation who identify with Christianity in the UK, whilst sometimes ignoring and not accepting the views of individuals who identify with a different religion.


The UK especially has an extremely westernised view of religion, this means a large majority of people adopt the majority of ideals that are typical of Europe, often ignoring other views. Something typical of a westernised nation is secularisation, where a place has become less religious over time.


It is evident that there is an amount of British citizens who hold a negative view on non-British cultures.


Looking at this from a personal experience, where I have heard countless times how non-English speakers should not speak their own language in England.


Take this image below regarding ‘Happy Brexit Day’ which was posted on foreign individual’s doors in Norwich, stating that they had “infected this once great island”.




It goes to show that these sick individuals who made this have no respect for anyone other than those who are exactly like themselves. Similar treatment is seen regarding Muslims who follow the religion known as Islam. Islamophobia has been on the rise in current years, especially after the Brexit vote. Many think that Islam will threaten traditional British values. These views have become evident in recent years in the cases of anti-Islammarches happening across the UK and vandalism on a number of mosques.





Read:"we should celebrate different languages, not write hate mail about them"



Footage of the one of many racist protests that are allowed to be carried out by 'far-right' protestors. Screaming chants like "Britain first, Fighting back", and claims that they want to "Get Rid" of all the muslims in Britain.


Some Brits carry these views, but some go even further to act out their opinions. One instance that I remember is the Finsbury Park attack, where a man called Darren Osbourne drove into a crowd of muslims near a London Mosque. This attack was carried out due to Darren’s hate for muslims, resulting in the death of Makram Ali, and injuring nine others. Police found a string of stereotypes that Darren had conceived about Muslims. He referred to muslims as ‘rapists’ and that they were ‘preying on our children’ (after watching the series three girls, which detailed the Rochdale grooming scandal; generalising a whole group).


These views were not just held by Darren. Many Brits who claim to be Christian do not feel the need to educate themselves on other religions, and therefore carry these awful opinions about a whole group of people. But surely if you follow the Christian religion, or any religion in fact, you should respect all individuals?


Our current Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has has previously claimed that Islamophobia is a “natural reaction” to Islam.


One of the biggest problems with anti-islam protestors is that protestors is that a lot of 'anti-islam' protestors assume that they are coming from a place of oppression. Without realising that they are literally playing the role of the oppressor, blindly. These views should not held by someone who is meant to be leading this multi faith and multi cultural country, as well as defending anti-islam protestors as if they are oppressed. There have been multiple times when Muslims hold protests to highlight the effects of oppression that have been shut down, or the main concern were statues over human beings. During protests for Shukri Abdi, police were seen protecting Churchill’s statue (yet again). It is evident from this that the police were more focused on protecting a white British man, who is DEAD and has nothing to do with the protests, rather than a young black, muslim girl who was killed. The care they have for white people compared to the majority black people who were protesting is a major concern, and has always been like this. It goes to show who is respected most in this country, especially as Shukri was killed due to her being muslim and was bullied heavily.


Many women wear a burqa, which is traditionally for some Islamic groups, and Boris Johnson has openly “joked'' about this, comparing them to “letter boxes” and “bank robbers”. Imagine you have a tradition that is ridiculed by none other than the leader of your country, whilst you are just trying to follow your religion and mind your own business.


Unfortunately, many religions cannot live peacefully in their home countries. Christianity is often seen as the “default” religion and many people are in fact dedicated to their religion without troubling others around them. However, some of these so-called Christians mistake the religion with British tradition. Many British citizens see Christianity as an English tradition and religion. Although many traditionalists refuse to believe and accept that Christianity did not originate in the UK. Many instead turn to other religions to tell them to “go back to your country”.


With the increase of 2nd and third generation citizens who are actually born in the UK, it would obviously make them feel as if they do not belong in society. Looking into this more, this especially affects how 2nd generation individuals are able to form their identity. For example, Africans born in the UK are influenced by both their first generation parents and other family members, and also western culture. They could feel connected to their African roots , but obviously not as much as their parents. They might not even be able to speak their native language (eg Igbo). However, they are also not fully comfortable in this westernised culture, as it is very ethnocentric. Therefore, there is this mid-point where some individuals may not be able to feel accepted by both groups, and struggle to form this combined identity. This is not always the case, but it is certainly difficult to find this common ground.


I think in this day and age, people have become too normalised to living in their own bubble, and only knowing one way of life. Everyone who is religious is dedicated to their own God; the goal to reach God may be different, but at the end of the day everyone’s main goal is similar. It seems that people have become more accepting in the modern day of other cultures and religions, but in a sense (mainly older) people still hold these out of date beliefs; especially as 64% of over 65s voted leave in the brexit vote, in comparison with just 29% of 18-24 year olds voting leave. These differences can also be seen in the ethnicity of voters, with the highest percentage voting leave being white Brits at 53% and every other ethnicity (mixed, Asian, black, Chinese and black) ranging from 27%-35% who voted leave. Rather than creating tension, religion should connect each individual, but it seems to be the ignition for horrendous incidents. Regardless of whether you are religious or not, what you decide to believe in should not be anyone else's problem, and rather than having biases on a religion, it should be appreciated and learnt about



With over 4,000 religions in the world, religion means something different to everyone. In a westernised society like the UK, secularism is on the rise with over 40% of individuals having no religious alliances. The main reason being that the older generation are being replaced by the younger demographic who are less in touch with their religion. Although the older generation usually identify with Christianity in the UK, whilst ignoring and sometimes not accepting the views of individuals who identify with a different religion.

The UK especially has an extremely westernised view of religion, meaning a large majority of people adopt the majority of ideals that are typical of Europe, and they often ignore other views. Something typical of a westernised nation is secularisation, where a place has become less religious over time.

It is evident that a lot of British citizens have a negative view on cultures that do not match theirs; this is especially clear in the case of Muslims who follow the religion known as Islam. The rise of Islamophobia has been on the rise in current years, especially after the Brexit vote. Many think that Islam will threaten traditional British values. These views have become evident in recent years in the cases of anti-Islammarches happening across the UK and vandalism on a number of mosques.

Some Brits carry these views, but some go even further to act out their opinions. One instance that I remember is the Finsbury Park attack, where a man (Darren Osbourne) drove into a crowd of muslims near a London Mosque. This attack was carried out due to Darren’s hate for muslims, killing Makram Ali, and injuring nine others. Police found a string of stereotypes that Darren had conceived about Muslims. He referred to muslims as ‘rapists’ and that they were ‘preying on our children’ (after watching the series three girls, which detailed the Rochdale grooming scandal; generalising a whole group).

These views were not just held by Darren. Many Brits who claim to be Christian do not feel the need to educate themselves on other religions, and therefore carry these awful opinions about a whole group of people. But surely if you follow the Christian religion, or any religion in fact, you should respect all individuals?

Someone else who holds these negative and disrespectful views are none other than our Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, who has previously claimed that Islamophobia is a “natural reaction” to Islam. Views held by someone who is meant to be leading this country that includes individuals of different races and religions etc. should not be known for these offensive statements. Many women wear a burqa, which is traditionally for some Islamic groups, and Boris Johnson has openly “joked'' about this, comparing them to “letter boxes” and “bank robbers”. Imagine you have a tradition that is ridiculed by none other than the leader of your country, whilst you are just trying to follow your religion and mind your own business.

Unfortunately, many religions cannot live peacefully in their home countries. Christianityy is often seen as the “default” religion and many people do in fact are dedicated to their religion, without troubling others around them. However, some of these so-called Christians use the religion as a British tradition. Many British citizens see Christianity as an English tradition and religion, although many traditionalists refuse to believe and accept that Christianity did not originate in the UK. Many instead turn to other religions to tell them to “go back to your country”. With the increase of 2nd and third generation citizens who are actually born in the UK, it would obviously make them feel as if they do not belong in society. Many often use this religion just so they have another argument to back up the fact that their opinions must be right, and are not in fact religious.

I think in this day and age, people have become too normalised to living in their own bubble, and only knowing one way of life. Everyone who is religious is dedicated to their own God; the goal to reach God may be different, but at the end of the day everyone’s main goal is similar. It seems that people have become more accepting in the modern day of other cultures and religions, but in a sense people still hold these out of date beliefs (mainly the older population). Rather than creating tension, religion should connect each individual, but it seems to be the ignition for horrendous incidents. Regardless of whether you are religious or not, what you decide to believe in should not be anyone else's problem, and rather than having biases on a religion, it should be appreciated and learnt about.


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